2016 Herping in review

Between 2013 and 2015, I was lucky enough to embark on an ecological odyssey to the UK. With backing from a Victorian Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, I set off for the University of York and spent a happy two years learning at the knee of Prof. Chris Thomas. Through daily chats with Chris, and the other great folk that called York’s J2 lab home, I gathered a sense of the incredible biodiversity data sets that UK ecologists have at their disposal. The British populace, I soon realised, are just as fanatical about collecting biodiversity data as they are about train spotting, building model aeroplanes and tracking down obscure antiques. From immense observational data sets, to comprehensive, statistically-rigorous monitoring programs, the Brits produce masses of species occurrence and abundance data every year. I was hugely impressed; not just with the British fervor for good, solid data, but the end products too – great ecological science and perhaps an unrivaled capacity to monitor the country’s biodiversity.

Returning to Australia, I had a new found sense of the importance of maintaining records of the species I see in my travels. Specifically, time-stamped occurrence data, the sorts of which are vital to producing species distribution maps and models, and which, in the long-term, can provide insights into population declines, range shifts or even invasions. I’ve been diligently keeping these records ever since, with annual uploads to the Victorian Biodiversity Atlas and the Atlas of Living Australia.

This post will be the first of an annual series sharing those records with you. My intentions are two-fold: i) to share a snippet of the wonderful reptiles and frogs I’ve had the pleasure of meeting each year, and; ii) to encourage you to keep these records too, and to submit them regularly to either a state or national biodiversity atlas.

So, what of 2016? In all, I managed 126 records of 53 species, with observations from the tropical forests of North Queensland, through southern Queensland, New South Wales and into the hills and plains of Victoria. I met numerous new species, including Scrub Python, Jungle Carpet Python, New England Tree Frog, Striped Burrowing Frog, Golden Crowned Snake, Cascade Tree Frog, Sudell’s Frog, Rugose Toadlet and Red-eyed Tree Frog. The full species list can be found in the table that follows, with further details here. I also had the opportunity to photograph many of the species I encountered this year, having finally managed to save enough pennies for a decent digital camera. I’ll leave off with a few of the images I captured (you can head over to my Flickr page if you would like to see more).

Until next year then. Here’s hoping 2017 is just as rewarding…

Species list:

Species Common Name
Amalosia lesueurii Lesueur’s Velvet Gecko
Amphibolurus muricatus Jacky Dragon
Boiga irregularis Brown Tree Snake
Cacophis squamulosus Golden Crowned Snake
Carlia tetradactyla Southern Rainbow Skink
Chelodina longicollis Common Long-necked Turtle
Christinus marmoratus Marbled Gecko
Concinnia martini Martin’s Skink
Crinia parinsignifera Plains Froglet
Crinia signifera Common Froglet
Cryptoblepharus pannosus Ragged Snake-eyed Skink
Ctenotus spaldingi Robust Skink
Ctenotus taeniolatus Copper-tailed Skink
Cyclorana alboguttata Striped Burrowing Frog
Delma impar Striped Legless Lizard
Diporiphora australis Tommy Roundhead
Egernia striolata Tree Skink
Emydura macquarii Murray River Turtle
Eulamprus quoyii Eastern Water Skink
Geocrinia victoriana Victorian Smooth Froglet
Chelonia mydas Green Sea Turtle
Hemidactylus frenatus Asian House Gecko
Hemiergis decresiensis Three-toed Skink
Intellagama lesueurii Eastern Water Dragon
Intellagama lesueurii howittii Gippsland Water Dragon
Lampropholis guichenoti Garden Skink
Land Mullet Bellatorias major
Lerista bouganvilli Bouganville’s Skink
Limnodynastes dumerilii Banjo Frog
Limnodynastes peronii Striped Marsh Frog
Limnodynastes tasmaniensis Spotted Marsh Frog
Liopholis modesta Eastern Ranges Rock Skink
Litoria aurea Green and Golden Bell Frog
Litoria caerulea Green Tree Frog
Litoria chloris Red-eyed Tree Frog
Litoria ewingii Southern Brown Tree Frog
Litoria fallax Eastern Dwarf Tree Frog
Litoria pearsoniana Cascade Tree Frog
Litoria peronii Peron’s Tree Frog
Litoria subglandulosa New England Tree Frog
Litoria verreauxii Whistling Tree Frog
Mixophyse fasciolatus Great Barred Frog
Morethia boulengeri Boulenger’s Skink
Neobatrachus sudelli Common Spade-foot Toad
Parasuta flagellum Little Whip Snake
Pogona barbata Eastern Bearded Dragon
Pseudechis porphyriacus Red-bellied Black Snake
Pseudomoia pagenstecheri Tussock Skink
Pseudonaja textilis Common Brown Snake
Strophurus intermedius Eastern Spiny-tailed Gecko
Tiliqua scincoides Eastern Blue-tongue
Tropidechis carinatus Rough-scaled Snake
Uperoleia rugosa Rugose Toadlet

Images:

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Cascade Tree Frog (Litoria pearsoniana), Springbrook QLD

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Eastern Brown Snake (Pseudonaja textilis), Redesdale VIC

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Gippsland Water Dragon (Intellagama lesueurii howittii), Mallacoota VIC

morelia_kinghorni

Scrub Python (Morelia kinghorni), Tully QLD

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Red-eyed Tree Frog (Litoria chloris), Mt Warning NSW

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Lesueur’s Velvet Gecko (Amalosia lesueurii), Retreat NSW

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